Afro hair growth

A woman’s worst nightmare has to be hair loss and shedding.  We may think that hair loss is reserved for middle aged men, but unfortunately, some queens too experience hair loss along the way.  This blog explores the many reasons for it and the possible treatments.

What is causing my hair loss?

Just like in men, some hair loss is genetic.  Alopecia areata and female pattern hair loss can both lead to dreaded baldness.  Our modern lifestyles can also be to blame for hair loss in Afro-Caribbean women.  Many of us have budding careers and hectic home lives which can lead to undue stress.  Our busy lifestyles or even lack of available funds or knowledge can also lead us to having a poor diet.  These two factors can additionally lead to hair loss.  Medical deficiencies such as anaemia, low vitamin D levels and abnormal thyroid hormones can also lead to hair loss in Afro-Caribbean women.

What about traction alopecia?

As long as we have known ourselves, braids and dreadlocks have been a mainstay in the Afro-Caribbean community.  Since the early 2000’s however, wigs and weaves have largely taken over as protective styling.  All of these varying styles can lead to traction alopecia.  Traction alopecia occurs when our hair is being pulled too tightly for too long.  This leads to inflammation of the hair follicle.  Traction folliculitis is when we feel pain from the pulling of our hair and little bumps start to form.  Thinning then occurs.  Thinning of afro hair in itself can be reversed mind you.  The issue we have as women however, is that we get addicted to these protective styles and try to regularly cover up our thinning patches.  This repeated tension can cause hair follicles to scar over and hair stops growing permanently; this is scarring alopecia.

How do you treat afro hair loss?

It goes without saying if these tight hairstyles are causing damage to our hair, then we as Afro-Caribbean women should refrain from using them.  Talented hair stylist can even cleverly cover up hair loss with alternative styles.  If the damage caused is not permanent, then the use of essential oils is recommended.  Essential oils such as thyme, rosemary, cedar wood and peppermint can be mixed with carrier oils like grape seed, coconut or olive for use as a treatment for the scalp.  Specialist doctors can also administer steroid injections for the scalp to rejuvenate hair growth.  If hair loss is permanent however, then only hair transplants can help

Our hair is our crowning glory.  Let’s do better at taking better care of our afro hair and preventing damage.  If you have any questions or comments on this topic then do feel free to send us at Nylah a message or leave a comment in the box below.

1 reply
  1. Michel
    Michel says:

    Most people are not aware that shampoos that grow your hair fast (obviously with no sulfates, no parabens or DEA) are even a thing. Individuals now may achieve longer hair and have more options. For sure worth considering.

    When you’re talking about alopecia, hair damage, preventing skin disorders, fast hair growth, hair care more often than not, similar thoughts become relevant.

    Generally, you have to steer clear of hair products and treatments that contain chemicals such as parabens, DEA and sulfates.

    What’s good for your hair is beneficial for your skin as well.

    Obviously your content above is so accurate for so many reasons. It stays away from the accustomed traps and traps too many fall into: getting ineffective alternatives. Greatly appreciated!

    Reply

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